As many are probably aware, October 31st, 2017 will mark the 500th anniversary of the day when Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses on the door of the All Saints’ Church in Wittenberg, Germany. In honor of the 500th anniversary, we’ve decided to dedicate posts during Reformation Month (October) to reflect Reformed theology, to give reasons for leaving the Catholic Church, and to show gratitude for an occurrence of a personal Reformation in our lives. With all of that being said, it would be a crime not to talk about the Five Solae of the Protestant Reformation.

The Five Solae (also called Five Solas) are the fundamental creeds of the historic Protestant faith, and they cannot be ignored when discussing the Reformation. Reformed and Lutheran Christians view the Five Solae as the clearest contradictions between Roman Catholicism and Christianity as taught in the Bible. The Five Solae were not fabricated by conceited men who only sought rebellion (as the Catholic church still sees the reformers to this day), but by men who feared God and developed their theology through the Scriptures.

Knowing this, the writers for The Reformed Alliance are more than excited to write for this series, as the Five Solae have become the rally cries for the Reformation. They perfectly encapsulate the reason as to why Protestantism exists, and what the reformers were fighting for. The schedule for the series this week is:

Monday: Sola Fide (by faith alone)
Tuesday: Sola Gratia (by grace alone)
Wednesday: Solus Christus (in Christ alone)
Thursday: Sola Scriptura (by Scripture alone)
Friday: Soli Deo Gloria (glory to God alone)

As I said before, we are thrilled to discuss the importance of the Five Solae, as well as answer the criticisms of the Catholic Church against each of them. May the Gospel of Jesus Christ be proclaimed as we share the meaning behind the Solae, and as we bring up the Scriptures that moved people such as Martin Luther and John Calvin to accept these truths. We hope you all will be blessed by the coming series, and that God will be glorified through our observance of the Reformation.

Soli Deo Gloria.