*The views of eschatology represented in this post is of the author’s and not necessarily the views of The Reformed Alliance.*

Well, brothers and sisters, we’ve come to the end of our series on crafting a biblical worldview through the lens of our four questions: 1) Where did we come from? 2) What is wrong with the world? 3) How is it fixed? 4) Where are we headed? 

So, where are we headed? Where are we going? If you look around Western Civilization, it is very tempting to conclude that things must be getting worse until we finally reach the end of civilization as we know it. However, this ignores a very simple, yet often overlooked, fact of life: the world does not revolve around you, your home town, your home country, or your way of life. Put simply, you’re not that important.

I make this point to say that the West does not reflect the health of the world any more than Rome determined the health of the world in the first and second centuries AD. Allow me to rephrase, while the West does give us a barometer of how far we have come as human beings, it does not determine how far we will go as human beings. Because of this, we cannot look to the West and determine that the world must be coming to an end despite what the dispensationalists say.

Because that’s the case, we must come up with some answer to the question “Where are we heading?” that isn’t “the toilet.” If we aren’t headed to the toilet, where are we headed? Let’s look at this through the lens of the Great Commission from Christ.

Matthew 28:16–20 (ESV)

16 Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. 17 And when they saw him they worshiped him, but some doubted. 18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

Based on the authority Jesus has in his Resurrection, we, the Church, are given the command to go and make disciples of all nations. What does this mean? That we will be successful in the making of disciples of all nations. And to confirm the success that Jesus implies here, he makes the statement, “And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” This means that our success is guaranteed in gospel proclamation! But, I am not the only one who hopes for such. Paul himself says the Creation longs for this as well!

Romans 8:19–23 (ESV)

19 For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God. 20 For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope 21 that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. 22 For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. 23 And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies.

We are heading, because of the success acquired through the death, burial, and resurrection of our Lord, toward all the nations proclaiming Christ as King of kings and Lord of lords! Based on his authority, we are promised, along with the Creation, the freedom of the glory of the children of God! Should we not then proclaim, with unabashed boldness, the glories of our God’s gospel to all people so that they may believe? May God be glorified by all people from everywhere! This is where we are headed!

Soli Deo Gloria!